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CockpitBuilders.com - Main => General Discusion Board. => Topic started by: Fly_AB on February 15, 2019, 05:38:36 AM

Title: Anyone seen OEM 737-900 ER Throttle Quadrant?
Post by: Fly_AB on February 15, 2019, 05:38:36 AM
Dear Friends,

I just want to share how the Boeing 737- 900 ER throttle in details.

I am lucky enough to get some cockpit parts from LION Air 737-900 ER which was accident back to 2012 in Bali.
When it happened, the Aircraft is still new, about 3 month after delivery from Boeing factory.

Here is the throttle pictures just in case anyone curious about the throttle of 737-900ER.

Thank you,

Best regards,
Arif




Title: Re: Anyone seen OEM 737-900 ER Throttle Quadrant?
Post by: Trevor Hale on February 15, 2019, 09:33:42 AM
What an amazing piece of history...  Wow.  Good for you.  Sad what happened but an excellent way to preserve the history.
Quote

Lion Air Flight 904 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Husein Sastranegara International Airport (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Husein_Sastranegara_International_Airport) in Bandung (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandung) to Ngurah Rai International Airport (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ngurah_Rai_International_Airport) in Bali (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bali), Indonesia. On 13 April 2013, the Boeing 737-800 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_737-800) operating the flight crashed into water short of runway while on final approach (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_approach_(aeronautics)) to land. All 101 passengers and 7 crew on board survived the accident.[1] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_Air_Flight_904#cite_note-avherald-1) At 15:10 local time (07:10 UTC), the aircraft crashed approximately 0.6 nautical miles (1.1 km) short of the seawall (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawall) protecting the threshold of Runway 09. The aircraft's fuselage (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuselage) broke into two[1] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_Air_Flight_904#cite_note-avherald-1) and 46 people were injured, 4 of them seriously.[2] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_Air_Flight_904#cite_note-2)
Among the findings contained in the final investigation report was that the crew continued the approach in adverse weather conditions beyond the point at which the approved procedure would have required to abort the landing. The subsequent attempt to go around (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_around) was made too late to avoid the impact with the sea. It was also determined that there were no issues with the aircraft and all systems were operating normally.
Title: Re: Anyone seen OEM 737-900 ER Throttle Quadrant?
Post by: Fly_AB on February 15, 2019, 10:32:18 AM
Thanks Trevor.

I'm waiting more than 1 year after the insurance company scraped it, they hold it for 1 years for investigation then scrapped.